31October2014

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You are here: Home Media Centre BAPEN Press Releases NICE recommends use of ‘MUST’ e-learning modules

NICE recommends use of ‘MUST’ e-learning modules

NICE has recommended the use of BAPEN’s interactive e-learning resource on nutritional screening using the ‘Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool’ (‘MUST’) for staff working in hospitals, primary care and care homes to aid implementation on the new NICE Quality Standards for Nutritional Support of Adults: http://guidance.nice.org.uk/QS24*. The three ‘MUST’ modules explain the causes and consequences of malnutrition, the importance of nutritional screening and how to screen using ‘MUST'.

All three ‘MUST’ modules are SCORM compliant and can link into national or local learning management systems used by Trusts/organisations to record completion of e-learning and  overcomes the need for separate reporting systems.  The modules equip staff to play a key part in improving the nutritional care of their residents/patients/clients as well as ensure compliance with the Care Quality Commission regulations, national nutritional care standards and the new NICE Quality Standards for Nutritional Support in Adults.

Each module includes case studies and care plans appropriate for the work place and an online assessment, together with the ability to print off certificates of achievement. Key Features include:

  • Tailored case studies to meet staff needs and place of work

  • Interactive and online

  • Approximately 45 minutes on average to complete

  • End of course assessment and certificate of completion

Standard hospital versions are freely available via ESR or the Department of Health e-lfh platform. However, all modules can be customised to include trust or organisational logos, a welcome from a senior manager and local care plans if desired. Costs for customisation will depend on the work required. Customised versions are available to purchase via the BAPEN website: www.bapen.org.uk.

For more information, interviews and comment:
Charlotte Messer or Helen Lawn
07928 700277/07879 818247/01892 525141

Note to editors:
*QS24 Quality Standards
Issued: November 2012

Quality standard for nutrition support in adults
Quality statement 1: Screening for the risk of malnutrition

Quality statement

People in care settings are screened for the risk of malnutrition using a validated screening tool.

Rationale

Malnutrition has a wide-ranging impact on people's health and wellbeing. Screening for the risk of malnutrition in care settings is important for enabling early and effective interventions. It is important that tools are validated to ensure that screening is as accurate and reliable as possible.

Quality measure

Structure:

a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that people in care settings are screened for the risk of malnutrition using a validated screening tool.

b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that screening for the risk of malnutrition is carried out by health and social care professionals who have undertaken training to use a validated screening tool.

c) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that care settings have access to suitably calibrated equipment to enable accurate screening to be conducted.

Process:

a) The proportion of people in care settings who are screened for the risk of malnutrition using a validated screening tool.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who are screened for the risk of malnutrition using a validated screening tool.

Denominator – the number of people in a care setting.

b) The proportion of people admitted to hospital who are re-screened weekly for the risk of malnutrition.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who are re-screened weekly for the risk of malnutrition. 

Denominator – the number of people admitted to hospital. 

c) The proportion of people in care home settings who are screened monthly for the risk of malnutrition.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who are screened monthly for the risk of malnutrition.

Denominator – the number of people in community care settings.

Outcome:

a) Incidence of people at risk of malnutrition.

b) Prevalence of risk of malnutrition.

BAPEN

BAPEN is a charitable association that raises awareness of malnutrition and works to advance the nutritional care of patients and those at risk from malnutrition in the wider community. www.bapen.org.uk

The association is made up of influential professional and patient organisations, which work in collaboration to improve and deliver safe and effective nutritional care throughout the UK:

  • BAPEN Medical is primarily aimed at doctors but is open to all those with an interest in clinical nutrition.  Its aims are: Education and training of clinicians at all levels; to encourage research and development and to foster collaborations between members’ research groups; to foster inter-disciplinary links and collaboration between medical specialties; to foster multi-professional links and collaboration between health professionals. www.bapen.org.uk
  • BAPEN regional reps are a multidisciplinary team of professionals working in the field of nutrition. Providing a local resource for education, training and support in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, they can be contacted via the BAPEN website.
  • The British Pharmaceutical Nutrition Group (BPNG) is a specialist  group for primarily pharmacists and scientists, but open to all with an interest in clinical nutrition. The group was founded in 1988 following growing concerns about the stability of parenteral nutrition feeds.  BPNG has published position statements on ‘multichamber bags’, in-line filtration of PN and calcium phosphate stability.  Education is now a focus for the group which runs multidisciplinary ‘fundamental parenteral nutrition’ and ‘advanced’ nutrition courses.  Publications include the ‘Handbook for drug administration via enteral feeding tubes’ and a competency framework for pharmacists working within clinical nutrition. www.bpng.co.uk
  • The British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN) provides professional leadership and promotes standards of care for children with nutritional, gastrointestinal and hepatological disorders.  Its membership includes consultants and specialist trainees in paediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition as well as specialist dietitians, nurses and nutrition pharmacists. The society supports research, training and education for members and the development of standards of care for children with nutritional disorders; it also gives advice and support to implement child-centred strategies to deliver nutrition assessment and nutrition support through the Nutrition & Intestinal Failure Working Group. www.bspghan.org.uk
  • The National Nurses Nutrition Group (NNNG) The NNNG was established in 1986. It is a registered charity which aims to promote education and the nursing role in nutrition and related subjects for the nursing profession for the benefit of patients in hospital and community environments. Over recent years the focus of the group has widened to reflect the increasing profile of nutrition: from screening strategies and mealtimes to the complex nature of artificial feeding. www.nnng.org.uk
  • The Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (PEN) Group is a specialist group of the British Dietetic Association. The PEN Group strives to train, educate, support and represent dietitians working in oral, enteral and parenteral nutrition support in all care settings. The group acts as the professional voice on matters pertaining to nutritional support and is a founder group of BAPEN. Members are registered dietitians who aim to ensure that nutritional support for patients is safe and clinically effective both in hospital and at home. www.peng.org.uk
  • PINNT is the UK support group for patients on home enteral or parenteral nutrition.  Established 25 years ago, PINNT has grown into a community that provides genuine understanding to help individuals and carers, deal with the many challenges faced on artificial feeding at home.  They also work closely with healthcare professionals, suppliers and manufacturers in order to enhance the patient journey. The PINNT network provides a unique and united voice to campaign for a better, flexible and safer service. www.pinnt.com